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Going green: IndyCar to use renewable fuel beginning in 2023

May 27, 2022 GMT
Roger Penske stands on the Yard of Bricks before practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Thursday, May 19, 2022, in Indianapolis. Penske took ownership of Indianapolis Motor Speedway just two months before the pandemic closed the country and only now, in his third Indianapolis 500 as promoter, can he throw open the gates and host more than 300,000 guests at “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”  (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Roger Penske stands on the Yard of Bricks before practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Thursday, May 19, 2022, in Indianapolis. Penske took ownership of Indianapolis Motor Speedway just two months before the pandemic closed the country and only now, in his third Indianapolis 500 as promoter, can he throw open the gates and host more than 300,000 guests at “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”  (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Roger Penske stands on the Yard of Bricks before practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Thursday, May 19, 2022, in Indianapolis. Penske took ownership of Indianapolis Motor Speedway just two months before the pandemic closed the country and only now, in his third Indianapolis 500 as promoter, can he throw open the gates and host more than 300,000 guests at “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”  (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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Roger Penske stands on the Yard of Bricks before practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Thursday, May 19, 2022, in Indianapolis. Penske took ownership of Indianapolis Motor Speedway just two months before the pandemic closed the country and only now, in his third Indianapolis 500 as promoter, can he throw open the gates and host more than 300,000 guests at “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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Roger Penske stands on the Yard of Bricks before practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Thursday, May 19, 2022, in Indianapolis. Penske took ownership of Indianapolis Motor Speedway just two months before the pandemic closed the country and only now, in his third Indianapolis 500 as promoter, can he throw open the gates and host more than 300,000 guests at “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — IndyCar will become the first North American racing series to use 100% renewable fuel in its race cars.

Shell, which recently signed a five-year extension to be the fuel sponsor for the open-wheel series, announced plans Friday to switch to a low-carbon fuel in 2023.

The new fuel will be a blend of second-generation ethanol derived from sugarcane waste and other biofuel, and it will create a fuel that is 100% comprised of feedstocks categorized as renewable under the applicable regulatory frameworks, according to Shell executives at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. It will decrease greenhouse gas emissions by 60% compared to fossil-based gasoline, according to the company.

Shell has set a goal of having a net zero carbon footprint within IndyCar by 2050.

“This race fuel development for IndyCar is a great example of how fuels technology is pivotal in helping decarbonize the sport,” Dr. Selda Gunsel, President of Shell Global Solutions, said in a statement.

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