Caddie discusses Bubba Watson, Masters, faith

April 5, 2017 GMT

Residents heard stories of life and faith as told by a Master’s caddie Tuesday night in North Augusta.

Ted Scott, caddie to two-time Master’s Champion Bubba Watson, spoke to a crowd at Grace United Methodist Church.

Scott started the night by talking about how his career as a caddie began attempt at being pro golfer himself. He said he failed to make it into a tournament qualifier in his hometown in Louisiana and decided to caddie for someone instead.

“I failed at being a professional golfer, so I figured if you can’t beat them, join them,” Scott laughed.

Scott started his caddie career working with pro golfer Grant Wade. He said he learned what being a caddie was all about with Wade.

“Something I learned from (Wade) was he told me no hole is hard if you execute – I never forgot that,” he said.

Scott said being a caddie is all about “giving support.”

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“You’re just there to give information as requested and give support as needed,” Scott said. “Some need a caddie, some need a coach and some need a daddy – it just depends.”

He then made the career move that changed his life – working as a caddie for Bubba Watson.

“Bubba Watson is the easiest guy in the world to caddie for,” Scott said. “I’m just there to help him stay focused. He is an artist and I carry the brushes. I’m not going to tell a painter, you know, to use some orange here.”

Scott was Watson’s caddie when he won the Master’s in 2012 and 2014.

“One of (Watson’s) best aspects is who he chooses as his friends,” he said. “He asked me to be his caddie because he wanted a Christian there to lift him up when he plays.”

Scott then went on to tell stories from the PGA Tour and previous Master’s Tournaments.

The night ended with Scott discussing his faith and how he found God later in life.

“God really changed my perspective and opened my eyes. Now I have a higher purpose,” he said.

At the end of event, baskets were handed out to collect donations to support flood relief efforts in South Carolina and Louisiana.