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‘Invisible Child’ is among winners of Lukas book prizes

March 23, 2022 GMT
This combination of cover images shows "Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City" by Andrea Elliott, left, and "Surviving Katyn: Stalin's Polish Massacre and the Search for Truth" by Jane Rogoyska. (Random House via AP, left, and Oneworld Publications via AP)
This combination of cover images shows "Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City" by Andrea Elliott, left, and "Surviving Katyn: Stalin's Polish Massacre and the Search for Truth" by Jane Rogoyska. (Random House via AP, left, and Oneworld Publications via AP)
This combination of cover images shows "Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City" by Andrea Elliott, left, and "Surviving Katyn: Stalin's Polish Massacre and the Search for Truth" by Jane Rogoyska. (Random House via AP, left, and Oneworld Publications via AP)
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This combination of cover images shows "Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City" by Andrea Elliott, left, and "Surviving Katyn: Stalin's Polish Massacre and the Search for Truth" by Jane Rogoyska. (Random House via AP, left, and Oneworld Publications via AP)
1 of 2
This combination of cover images shows "Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City" by Andrea Elliott, left, and "Surviving Katyn: Stalin's Polish Massacre and the Search for Truth" by Jane Rogoyska. (Random House via AP, left, and Oneworld Publications via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — Andrea Elliott’s chronicle of a homeless girl in New York City, “Invisible Child,” and Jane Rogoyska’s investigation into Stalin’s atrocities in Poland, “Surviving Katyń,” are among the recipients of awards presented by the J. Anthony Lukas Prize Project.

On Wednesday, “Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City” was named the winner of the $10,000 Lukas Book Prize for an outstanding nonfiction work of “American political or social concern.” Rogoyska’s “Surviving Katyń: Stalin’s Polish Massacre and the Search for Truth” won the $10,000 Mark Lynton History Prize for combining “intellectual distinction with felicity of expression.”

Two authors received $25,000 each as winners of the Lukas Work-In-Progress Award: Roxanna Asgarian for “We Were Once a Family: The Hart Murder-Suicide and the System Failing Our Kids” and May Jeong for “The Life: Sex, Work, and Love in America.”

The Lukas project, named for the late author and investigative journalist, was founded in 1998 and is co-administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.